Proper Job, or brave regiment from Cornwall


Continuing review of the beers from St Austell Brewery I present today Proper Job – famous India Pale Ale from Cornwall.

 

Beer was first brewed in December 2005 specially for Celtic Beer Festival organised by the brewery St Austell.

 

That ale was dedicated to the 32nd Regiment, coming from Cornwall, who bravely defended their garrison during the sepoy rebellion in 1857-1858.
It was an armed revolt against the British, known as Great Mutiny, or Indian Mutiny. The rebellion was suppressed, and consequently the British East India Company lost control over India, which were formally incorporated into the British Empire.
In recognition of a ‘Proper Job’, Queen Victoria awarded the 32nd the honour of becoming a Light Infantry Regiment.

 

In today’s post I intended initially to combine a review of Proper Job with beer coming from the trade network Marks and SpencerCornish IPA. The information that is available in the web indicates that it is the same beer, as in the case of Admiral’s Ale and Cornish Red Ale from the same brewery, which I described previously.
Why I depart from this idea? About that I will write in the next post.
Anyway, today I put description of tasting only the beer Proper Job.

That ale is considered to be one of the classic English IPA in American style. Brewed with the addition of a blend of American hop varieties, as the label says: Powerfully hopped, has been appreciated by crowds of admirers of this style.

Proper Job regularly wins prizes awarded by representatives of the brewing industry (SIBA), as well as consumer associations (CAMRA).
Among the titles include Champion Beer of Britain: Gold in 2011, Silver in 2013 and 2014.
I remind that the full list of awards granted to St Austell Brewery is available at that website.

Proper Job is beer in the style of India Pale Ale, or more precisely American Pale Ale.
Among used hops are in fact only US varieties:

  • Willamette (popular in the United States variety with herbal-fruity aroma)
  • Cascade (gives aromas of citrus, grapefruit)
  • Chinook (highly bitterish variety, which brings aromas of resin and grapefruit).

In the grist it uses the classic malt Maris Otter.

It promises to be so very aromatic and delicious – the time to verify.

 

 

Name: PROPER JOB (American Pale Ale, alc. 5,5% ABV)
Brewery: St Austell Brewery (St Austell, Cornwall, England)

Expiration date: 09/2016 (bottle conditioned, 500ml)

Proper Job from St Austell Brewery - beer (1)
Proper Job from St Austell Brewery -labels
Proper Job from St Austell Brewery - beer (3)

 

test-look-small Golden colour.
White foam, from the beginning quite high and fine bubbles, very quickly perforates and falls
– remains only the thin layer.
test-sniff-small The aroma is dominated by citruses and tropical fruits.
The present is a note of pine, resinous. There is also a floral accent.
test-drink-small At first perceptible slight sweetness immediately is dominated by citruses (grapefruit).
We get almost immediately a large dose of citrus-dry bitterness,
reminiscent of bitter grapefruit.
We feel also in the meantime: hops, tropical fruits (mango, pineapple), resinous note.
But everything happens quickly – right away we go to the finish,
which is very dry, herbal-citrusy with a hint of pine.
Bodied and carbonation at a medium level.

 

Proper Job from St Austell Brewery - beer (4)

 

Proper Job is delicious beer.
Fruity aroma with a hint of resinous promises a typical APA and taste confirms it. We have in it a slight malty sweetness right away lined with citruses, grapefruits. Noticeable are the accents of tropical fruits and notes of pine.
Everything quickly covered with expressive herbal-citrusy bitterness.
The finish highlights the style of beer – is clear, dry, grapefruit with resinous note.
Another sip and the next to feel all the flavours and enjoy this delicious refreshing ale.
It’s real proper job!

 

rating-5

 

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